Shopsmith Power Stand

Bandsaw

I wanted to make a separate power stand for my Shopsmith bandsaw and belt sander without changing the current Shopsmith operation.

Stand

I started with a stand made from 4×4’s with 2×4 cross members bolted together with lag bolts. I made the stand 30 inches tall before attaching the sub-base. The 4×4 were cut at a 10 degree compound angle top and bottom. The outside lengths and widths were 25 and 22 inches at the bottom and 13 and 10 inches at the top. Note the angled cleats attached to the legs for mounting the motor.

Motor Mounting

I used a 1/2 hp motor turning at 1725 rpm with capacitive start. The motor wiring should allow the shaft rotation to be changed to match your mounting requirements. The motor was mounted to a piece of 3/4 inch plywood which was secured to cleats mentioned above with 3/8 inch captured hex bolts. Two and 1/2 inch long slots in the plywood mounting base allowed the motor base to be moved up and down while attaching the pulley belt. Don’t finalize the stand dimensions until you have the motor you will be using in hand and can determine the amount of space it needs within the stand. I used a 48 inch twist lock V-belt. You can adjust the length of the belt by adding or removing links.

Base and Sub-base

I made the sub-base and base out of 3/4 x 17 x 17 inch plywood. A 4 inch by 1.5 inch slot was cut to allow the drive belt to pass through. This was later enlarged (made wider) on the sub-base to allow lateral adjustment of the base to align with the motor pulley (this varies depending on which Shopsmith accessory is attached).

Machine Base

Next I made the accessory base out of 12 x 9 x 1 1/2 inch thick oak. I added a top layer of 4 x 12 x 3/4 inch persimmon on top of this to provide enough thickness to drill the requisite 1 1/4 inch diameter by 1 3/4 inch deep mounting holes for the accessory base to be inserted into.

OnOffSwitch

I mounted a steel electrical switch box to the front of the plywood motor base and wired in a 15 amp decorator (rocker arm) switch. For safety a 3/4 inch faceplate was added to recess the switch surface to prevent it from being powered accidentally.

Knee Swtich

Now a thin piece of oak with a notch in the upper section was placed over the switch face. Finger pressure in the notch turns the switch on, and knee pressure will turn the switch off – allowing hands and eyes to be kept on the machine. The lower portion of the oak cover was laminated on the inside surface to reduce the amount of travel required to engage the lower portion of the rocker switch.

Side Drawers

To further enclose the motor area under the stand, I made tip out drawers that fit between the legs on the sides. The rounded projection on the sides is for insertion of the two screws which are loosely fastened into the legs and about which the drawer pivots. I store different size pulleys and extra links for the drive belt in them.

Drawers Open

Here you can see the drawers installed and opened. Gravity keeps the drawers closed. Light pressure on the bottom side of the drawer will cause them to pivot open.

Motor and Pulley enclosed.

The drive belt and pulley were enclosed to protect the user. The motor was enclosed on the back side to keep sawdust from getting into the motor. Several inches of space around the motor was left to allow air flow for cooling.

Front View

Front view of the Bandsaw. Other considerations: This stand was intended for the bandsaw or belt sander only. It is underpowered for the joiner. Pulley size selection determines the accessory speed. Recommended speeds for the bandsaw vary from about 750 to 1200 rpm. Belt sander from about 1150 to 1750. Consult the v-belt vendor for minimum recommended pulley size. See Pully Calc for help determining your pulley sizes.

Souped Up Dust Collector

I waited a long time (read years) to get a dust collector. I was hoping the cyclones would fall dramatically in price. But then never did. At Christmas, I finally bit the bullet and got this 2HP single stage unit from Harbor Freight, knowing full well that I would "fix it up". I picked it because it is cheap (list price is $249, but you can find $100 off coupons in any woodworking magazine), it also looks identical to the Rixon model sold by Woodcraft for $399.

I waited a long time (read years) to get a dust collector. I was hoping the cyclones would fall dramatically in price. But then never did. At Christmas, I finally bit the bullet and got this 2HP single stage unit from Harbor Freight, knowing full well that I would “fix it up”. I picked it because it is cheap (list price is $249, but you can find $100 off coupons in any woodworking magazine), it also looks identical to the Rixon model sold by Woodcraft for $399.

The first thing I did was turn it into a two stage dust collector by connecting a trash can separator to it. I already had the Woodcraft trash can separator lid which I had used with my 13 inch planer. Planers produce a tremendous amount of chips, and the trash can is an efficient way to capture them. As I mentioned in my dust collection post, the trash can separator not only provides an easier way to deal with sawdust, but it is also provides a measure of safety by not allowing big chunks of wood or metal pieces from floor sweepings from impacting the dust collector impeller and causing damage or sparks which would be catastrophic with fine dust.

The first thing I did was turn it into a two stage dust collector by connecting a trash can separator to it. I already had the Woodcraft trash can separator lid which I had used with my 13 inch planer. Planers produce a tremendous amount of chips, and the trash can is an efficient way to capture them. As I mentioned in my dust collection post, the trash can separator not only provides an easier way to deal with sawdust, but it is also provides a measure of safety by not allowing big chunks of wood or metal pieces from floor sweepings from impacting the dust collector impeller and causing damage or sparks which would be catastrophic with fine dust.

Finewoodworking published an article entitled "Soup Up Your Dust Collector" in issue #232. Seems I wasn't the only one with the idea of improving on a cheap model. Thankfully, their article saved me a lot of legwork.  The first thing I did was to order a Wynn C-1425 0.5 micron canister filter to replace the 5 micron felt bag that came with the Harbor Freight model I had. Notice the 1/2 inch by 1/2 inch rubberized seal on the bottom of the canister in the picture.

Finewoodworking published an article entitled “Soup Up Your Dust Collector” in issue #232. Seems I wasn’t the only one with the idea of improving on a cheap model. Thankfully, their article saved me a lot of legwork. The first thing I did was to order a Wynn C-1425 0.5 micron canister filter to replace the 5 micron felt bag that came with the Harbor Freight model I had. Notice the 1/2 inch by 1/2 inch rubberized seal on the bottom of the canister in the picture.

The first order of business was to come up with a way to mount the canister in place of the felt bag. I went about this differently than in the Finewoodworking article. I made a plywood ring that fit snugly inside the body of the dust collector body. Three partial rings attached to the underside of the top ring sat down on the dust collection sheet metal cone and space the assembly flush with the top of the dust collection housing. I ran three screws in through the sides to hold it in place, then used siliconized caulk to seal around the top edge. After letting it cure overnight, I turned it upside down and poured bondo along the inside perimeter to give me a permanent seal.

The first order of business was to come up with a way to mount the canister in place of the felt bag. I went about this differently than in the Finewoodworking article. I made a plywood ring that fit snugly inside the body of the dust collector body. Three partial rings attached to the underside of the top ring sat down on the dust collection sheet metal cone and space the assembly flush with the top of the dust collection housing. I ran three screws in through the sides to hold it in place, then used siliconized caulk to seal around the top edge. After letting it cure overnight, I turned it upside down and poured bondo along the inside perimeter to give me a permanent seal.

Next I added a Thein baffle (see jpthein.com or the Finewoodworking article) below the underside of the cone in the dust collection housing. The Thein baffle isolates the sawdust in the bag below from the filter above to keep the filter pleats from plugging with fine sawdust.  You can see the Thein baffle mounted below the cone in this picture. You can also see the latches I have mounted to the side of the housing. These engage the steel lip on the bottom of the canister filter and hold it securely. I obtained them from J.W.Winco Inc (www.jwwinco.com): part number 50ENEK.

Next I added a Thein baffle (see jpthein.com or the Finewoodworking article) below the underside of the cone in the dust collection housing. The Thein baffle isolates the sawdust in the bag below from the filter above to keep the filter pleats from plugging with fine sawdust.
You can see the Thein baffle mounted below the cone in this picture. You can also see the latches I have mounted to the side of the housing. These engage the steel lip on the bottom of the canister filter and hold it securely. I obtained them from J.W.Winco Inc (www.jwwinco.com): part number 50ENEK.

After perusing J.P.Thein's website, I decided to replace my Woodcraft trash separator lid with one of his design for two reasons: 1) I didn't feel I was getting a good seal, and 2) I know from experience that as the trash can continued to fill up, more sawdust would start spewing out the outlet port.  To make mine I followed his basic instructions, but made the top circle bigger too allow an outside lip to be added, so that the lip of the trash can was captured between an inside and outside ring. I put 3/8 inch adhesive foam insulation in this grove to make a tighter seal. You may wonder why I needed two Thein baffles, one in the trash can and the other in the dust collector. The reason is that my dust collector has two 4 inch ports. I dedicate one to my SawStop (thus the baffle in the dust collector), and the other to my other stationary tools via the trash can separator.

After perusing J.P.Thein’s website, I decided to replace my Woodcraft trash separator lid with one of his design for two reasons: 1) I didn’t feel I was getting a good seal, and 2) I know from experience that as the trash can continued to fill up, more sawdust would start spewing out the outlet port.
To make mine I followed his basic instructions, but made the top circle bigger too allow an outside lip to be added, so that the lip of the trash can was captured between an inside and outside ring. I put 3/8 inch adhesive foam insulation in this grove to make a tighter seal.
You may wonder why I needed two Thein baffles, one in the trash can and the other in the dust collector. The reason is that my dust collector has two 4 inch ports. I dedicate one to my SawStop (thus the baffle in the dust collector), and the other to my other stationary tools via the trash can separator.

Here you can see the canister mounted on the Dust collector, and new Thein baffle lid on the trash can separator.

Here you can see the canister mounted on the Dust collector, and new Thein baffle lid on the trash can separator.