SawStopAddOns

I got a Sawstop Table saw for Xmass! First thing I did was add a table Extension.


I got a Sawstop Table saw for Xmass! First thing I did was add a table Extension.


The extension table is two parts, which allows it to fold down along the back of the saw for storage.


The extension table is two parts, which allows it to fold down along the back of the saw for storage.


This is a view of the bottom side of the extension table. You can see the hinges, and the angle iron brackets which allow the telescoping legs to foldup under the table.


This is a view of the bottom side of the extension table. You can see the hinges, and the angle iron brackets which allow the telescoping legs to foldup under the table.


The safest and most accurate way to make crosscuts on a table saw is to use a sled. Here's mine. The quick grip is holding the block I clamp to the rear fence for cutting multiple pieces exactly the same length. Low tech but effective.


The safest and most accurate way to make crosscuts on a table saw is to use a sled. Here’s mine. The quick grip is holding the block I clamp to the rear fence for cutting multiple pieces exactly the same length. Low tech but effective.


Over the fence push stick for narrow stock.


Over the fence push stick for narrow stock.


Over the fence Tenon Jig. I use a bar clamp to hold stock securely against upright.


Over the fence Tenon Jig. I use a bar clamp to hold stock securely against upright.


I bolted a 1x board to the side of the left side of the table using existing holes. This not only covers the (very) sharp rear corner of the table but also gives me a place to hang push sticks.


I bolted a 1x board to the side of the left side of the table using existing holes. This not only covers the (very) sharp rear corner of the table but also gives me a place to hang push sticks.


I opted for the 52 inch saw to give me plenty of room for cutting 4x8 sheets of plywood. I filled the hole under the table with a roll around cart. It is on casters so  I can pull it out and use it as a work surface. I was still working on the drawers in this shot.


I opted for the 52 inch saw to give me plenty of room for cutting 4×8 sheets of plywood. I filled the hole under the table with a roll around cart. It is on casters so I can pull it out and use it as a work surface. I was still working on the drawers in this shot.



I made a zero clearance insert out of 1/2 inch MDF. I just had to trace the outline of the one that came with the saw, and drill a few holes on the bottom side to accommodate the leveling screws on the saw. I also drilled and tapped the saw to allow a hold-down screw to be used, but that may be overkill.  Rockler has a hardware kit for a miter gauge feather board. I used it and the picture on the package to come up with this one. I used popular for this one, and I was quite pleased, the fingers have good flexibility. as opposed to the oak ones I have made. If you do use oak, make sure that the fingers are aligned along the grain, or they will break off easily.

I made a zero clearance insert out of 1/2 inch MDF. I just had to trace the outline of the one that came with the saw, and drill a few holes on the bottom side to accommodate the leveling screws on the saw. I also drilled and tapped the saw to allow a hold-down screw to be used, but that may be overkill.
Rockler has a hardware kit for a miter gauge feather board. I used it and the picture on the package to come up with this one. I used popular for this one, and I was quite pleased, the fingers have good flexibility. as opposed to the oak ones I have made. If you do use oak, make sure that the fingers are aligned along the grain, or they will break off easily.

Cutting small parts presents a set of challenges. Not only keeping your fingers safe, but also not losing the small part  just cut. The small parts sled addresses both issues. The sled carries both pieces past the blade, without any risk of losing it down along side the blade. The blocks on the rear of the sled fence enclose the blade to help prevent accidents.

Cutting small parts presents a set of challenges. Not only keeping your fingers safe, but also not losing the small part just cut. The small parts sled addresses both issues. The sled carries both pieces past the blade, without any risk of losing it down along side the blade. The blocks on the rear of the sled fence enclose the blade to help prevent accidents.

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